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Armenian, Jewish Communities to Screen ‘Denial’ to Commemorate Armenian Genocide, Holocaust

As Armenians and Jews around world will gather on April 24th to commemorate Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day and Yom HaShoah, which happen to fall on the same day this year, the local Boca Raton Armenian and Jewish communities are happy to announce a joint program of remembrance with a screening of the film ‘Denial’ at Congregation B’nai Isreal, 2200 Yamato Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431 on Sunday, April 23rd at 6:00pm.

Based on the book Denial: Holocaust History on Trial, DENIAL recounts Deborah E. Lipstadt’s (Academy Award® winner Rachel Weisz) legal battle for historical truth against David Irving (BAFTA nominee Timothy Spall), who accused her of libel when she declared him a Holocaust denier. In the English legal system, in cases of libel, the burden of proof is on the defendant, therefore it was up to Lipstadt and her legal team, led by Richard Rampton (Academy Award® nominee Tom Wilkinson), to prove the essential truth that the Holocaust occurred.

The event is FREE and open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will be served. Brief remarks will be delivered by local Armenian and Jewish community leaders. The evening will conclude with a candlelit prayer service.

Please RSVP in advance by clicking on the image below.

AGC Denial Flyer - High Res

Eventbrite register

About the organizers:

Armenian Genocide Commemoration, Inc (AGC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to observe and commemorate the Armenian Genocide of 1915 when the Ottoman Turkish Empire systematically annihilated 1.5 million Armenians through a campaign of ethnic cleansing, as well as raise public awareness of all genocides.  AGC is responsible for planning and executing all Armenian Genocide related activities within Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties.

Founded in 1989, Congregation B’Nai Israel is now considered one of the landmark reform congregations in the country. With nearly 1,000 families, a religious school serving over 600 students, and early childhood programs considered one of the finest in the nation, Congregation B’nai Israel, or CBI, is more than just a synagogue. It is a thriving and connected Jewish community, joyfully inspired by tradition and passionately committed to worship, study and repairing the world.

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The Persistent Past: How Violence and Genocide in Ottoman Turkey Affects Our World Today

The Persistent Past: How Violence and Genocide in Ottoman Turkey Affects Our World Today

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Historian Ronald Grigor Suny will give a talk entitled The Persistent Past at the USF Tampa Library on Monday, April 23 at 7 pm. Suny is the Charles Tilly Collegiate Professor of Social and Political History and Director of the Eisenberg Institute of Historical Studies at the University of Michigan, as well as Emeritus Professor of Political Science and History at the University of Chicago.

About the lecture:

A century ago, the Young Turk government carried out deportations and massacres of various peoples in the Ottoman Empire: Armenians, Assyrians, Greeks, Jews, Arabs, and others.  Several of these brutal relocations have been designated ‘genocide,’ yet the current Turkish state, along with the United States and other countries, refuses to label any of them ‘genocide.’  The denial of past violence and its erasure from historical memory has allowed violence and human rights abuses to continue, worldwide, to the present day.

Please join us on Monday, April 23, 2012 at 7 pm . Here are directions to the USF Tampa Library.

Presented by the USF Libraries Holocaust and Genocide Studies Center and cosponsored by the USF Department of History.

SOURCE: http://lib.usf.edu/hgsc/category/events/

Armenian Studies Event at USF Explores Ethics, National Security, Genocide

Armenian Studies Event at USF Explores Ethics, National Security, Genocide

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011
University of South Florida, Holocaust & Genocide Studies Center

The USF Libraries Holocaust & Genocide Studies Center continued their ongoing effort to raise public awareness and encourage the teaching of tolerance with the presentation of the second annual Armenian Studies Symposium on November 4th, 2011. Free and open to the public, attendees filled the Grace Allen Room to capacity, even standing in adjacent rooms to listen in.

Dr. Taner Akcam

Respected Armenian Genocide studies scholar Taner Akçam gave a keynote talk on the Turkish government’s justification for suppressing free speech in the name of national security, a practice with far-reaching implications, from classrooms to contemporary international relations. Akçam‘s talk was followed by a panel discussion featuring USF scholars Edward Kissi, Rachel May, and Steven C. Roach comparing the Turkish situation to the US treatment of Native Americans and it’s long period of slavery, and other genocides around the world throughout history. If you were not able to attend, you can watch a video of the November 4th event here.

The Armenian Studies event was one in a series of public events the USF Holocaust & Genocide Studies Center has hosted with the aim of calling attention to the intolerant behaviors that have led to genocides and crimes against humanity, in hopes of preventing future genocides and hate crimes. USF Holocaust and genocide studies librarian Musa Olaka relates how the Armenian programming fits into the bigger picture: “The Armenian Studies initiative provides resources and inroads for USF faculty and students to engage in critical study of comparative genocide, genocide denial, and the fight against genocidal ideology around the world.”

USF Scholars Edward Kissi, Steven C. Roach, and Rachel May

In addition to print media coverage in the Maddux Report and the Armenian press, the event was reported on by WMNF radio, 88.5. Listen to the in-depth radio report.

Do you want to support education, programming and collections that can help create a better world?

Contact USF to advance these and other efforts: Merrell Dickey (813) 974-1654 mdickey@usf.edu.

SOURCE: University of South Florida, Holocaust & Genocide Studies Program