Blog Archives

In Memoriam: Connie Alchian

Connie Alchian (11/27/1925 – 7/12/2021)

BOCA RATON, FL – It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Connie Alchian (11/27/1925 – 7/12/2021), whose warm presence and friendly smile has been an integral part of our South Florida Armenian American community and St. David Armenian Church family for the last four decades. We will miss her greatly and we offer our sincere condolences to her entire family.

Unfortunately, Funeral Service has been CANCELLED due to an increase in COVID-19 cases in Palm Beach County, FL.

The family of Connie Alchian announced the passing of 96 year old Connie Alchian on August 18. Connie is survived by her loving sister Rose Killian, her niece Lynn Abbate and husband William Abbate of Delray Beach Florida – and their family Ryan and Kariann, and Bill of New Jersey and New York respectively, and their 4 grandchildren; and her nephew Barry Tarzy and his wife Alice and their family – Tami and Joel Aronow, Scott and Pauline Tarzy, Jim and Barbara Tarzy, and Michael and Stacy Tarzy– and their 11 grandchildren all of New Jersey. Connie’s two brothers, John and Sargent both pre-deceased her.

Born in New Jersey in 1925, Connie attended both grammar school and high school there. Her father died when she was very young, and shortly afterwards she and her mother went to California on vacation to be with relatives. They decided to stay in California and it was there that Connie met Bob Alchian, and in time they were wed. Years later, Connie and Bob retired in Florida living close to her sister Rose and husband Leo. Connie and her sister Rose were inseparable, traveling together often, and especially in serving St. David’s Armenian Church as active members of the Church Women’s Guild. Her memory will live forever in our Church and wider South Florida Armenian family. May she rest in peace in the Kingdom of Heaven.

Upon the request of the family, donations may be made to:

St. David Armenian Church
2300 Yamato Rd.
Boca Raton, FL 33431

VIDEO: A Master Plan? Russo-Azeri Strategy for Armenian Pacification

FAIRLAWN, NEW JERSEY – On Wednesday, June 30, National Association for Armenian Studies and Research (NAASR) hosted a webinar with expert analysts Lilit Gevorgyan and Armen Kharazian, entitled “A Master Plan? Russo-Azeri Strategy for Armenian Pacification.”

The analysts discusses the shifting sands of Armenia’s defense architecture, the logic and driving factors of Russia’s realignment with Azerbaijani state-building and economic regional initiatives, the foundation and impact of a shared Russo-Azeri vision that is unfolding in real time to achieve far-reaching objectives, continued Russian and Azeri challenges to post-war sovereignty in Artsakh and the Republic of Armenia, and much more.

This event was co-sponsored by the following organizations: Ararat-Eskijian Museum Armenian Bar Association; Armenian Democratic Liberal Party/Ramgavars; Armenian Network of America-Greater NY; Daughters of Vartan-Sahaganoush Otyag; Justice Armenia; Knights of Vartan-Bakradouny Lodge; National Association for Armenian Studies and Research NAASR / Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Lecture Series on Contemporary Armenian Issues; and St. Leon Armenian Church.

Armenian American Community Mourns the Loss of Three Titans

This past April, as Armenian Americans across the country were working hard and eagerly waiting to see if President Biden would recognize the Armenian Genocide in his first April 24th remembrance day statement, the community was also mourning the loss of three extraordinary men who would leave the their mark on the world in a way that makes all of us proud to be both Armenian and American.

In the beginning of April, the news broke that long time philanthropist and American homebuilder Hirair Hovnanian had passed away at his residence in Yerevan, Armenia, where he had retired after an impressive and successful life and career.

Anna Hovnanian & Hirair Hovnanian

A bold, daring and caring individual, a visionary leader, the founder and benefactor of many charities, and devoted longtime Chairman of the Armenian Assembly of America’s Board, Hirair Hovnanian leaves behind a remarkable legacy. Hirair was an amazing leader and mentor, always ready to roll up his sleeves and tackle any challenge. Hirair’s integrity, passion, dedication, commitment, work ethic, and love of his people, were extraordinary.

A successful businessman, whose generosity extended to causes around the world, Hirair felt energized by the independence of Armenia, and did everything in his power to assist the newly independent Republic. He demonstrated his commitment to Armenia by resettling in his homeland where his philanthropy extended beyond precedent. Hirair responded immediately to the 1988 earthquake and embarked upon the recovery and rebuilding of the devastated areas. A builder and developer by profession, he knew exactly the type of assistance required and established a building parts manufacturing plant to accelerate the reconstruction process. His generous contributions in support of educational and religious institutions in Armenia and the diaspora are legion.

At the helm of the Assembly, he helped shape non-partisan advocacy, creating an example of a united voice for Armenian Americans in Washington, D.C., and strongly believed in the unique role of American leadership in advancing democracy and human rights. He lent every measure of support within his means towards the affirmation of the Armenian Genocide, including the establishment of the Armenian National Institute. He welcomed Armenian Assembly interns to his home every summer and embraced the next generation with his infectious enthusiasm for all things Armenian. Through his boundless generosity, he touched the lives of countless citizens in Armenia and Artsakh to whom he exemplified the best of the Armenian diaspora.

“We are all saddened by this great loss and remain immensely grateful to Hirair for his unparalleled legacy. He was the champion of every cause that benefited the Armenian people, and he never hesitated to lead from the front with unwavering dedication and commitment. May he rest in peace,” read a statement from the Armenian Assembly.

Ambassador Set Charles Momjian, a former trustee and board member of the Armenian Assembly, passed away on Monday, April 12, 2021 in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania.

“He was born in Atlantic City on April 9, 1930 to Julia and Charles Momjian, both orphaned refugees from the Armenian genocide who were raised by American missionaries. The two parents were born in Malatya in the Ottoman Empire. Charles died at an early age and the family, which included younger brother Albert, had a difficult time during the Depression era,” the Armenian Mirror-Spectator reported.

After enrolling in the U.S. Army, Set Momjian led a prolific career in marketing and advertising at the Ford Motor Company. He went on to become a special advisor to U.S. presidents, and, per President Jimmy Carter’s appointment, served as a U.S. representative to the United Nations with the rank of Ambassador. Momjian was also appointed as a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council by President Ronald Reagan in 1981.

Momjian’s impactful commitment to the Assembly and Armenian causes on Capitol Hill is still relevant today. His longtime friendship with President Joe Biden was cultivated during train rides he shared in the 1980s with the Delaware Senator, who was then Chairman of the Judiciary Committee and marshaled through committee approval of an Armenian Genocide resolution, which Senator Bob Dole (R-KS) brought to the Senate Floor in 1990.

“The Assembly appreciates the Momjian family’s dedication, including Set Charles Momjian’s brother Albert’s many years of service as the Assembly’s Solicitor, a role which Albert’s son, Mark Momjian, currently holds. The Assembly extends its condolences to Set Charles Momjian’s family and loved ones,” an announcement from the Assembly stated. Momjian was also active with the AGBU and the Knights of Vartan.

Dr. Vartan Gregoain

Three days later, on Thursday, April 15th, the world mourned the loss of Dr. Vartan Gregorian, President of the Carnegie Corporation, and one of the most famous Armenians in American history.

Dr. Gregorian was invaluable in the Armenian American community’s efforts to educate the public about the Armenian Genocide and the consequences of its denial. He led the way for others who followed in his footsteps in academia, administrative leadership at top universities, and as a world leader of philanthropy and education. His life’s work, much to long to list in a single column, took him to incredible places across the globe and led to his service in prestigious posts, such as the “Savior of The New York Public Library,” as the New York Times catalogued, as well as President of Brown University, and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, to name but a few.

“This is a painful loss for all Armenians, the United States, and the world. His achievements will stand the test of time, and the spirit in which he delivered those achievements will always be valued. May he rest in peace,” a statement from the Armenian Assembly read.